Gabapentin For Opiate Withdrawal

Discussion in 'Discussions on Withdrawals, Detox & Rehab' started by Jegbenew, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Jegbenew

    Jegbenew New Member

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    Hi, I am quitting opiates for the second time, and this time my doc has put me on Gabapentin. I am just curious to know if anybody else out there has taken Gabapentin for opiate cessation and if so, what they experienced with the Gabapentin. Thanks!
     
  2. foolsgold

    foolsgold New Member

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    I have been scripted Gabapentin for my nerve damage in my back. I take 900 mg daily and have done so for the last three years. I had dosed up to 1,500 mg daily, but later reduced the dose, when side effects started as soon as I forgot to take my Gabapentin.

    I really want to get off Gabapentin one day. Yet, it seems to help my back pain. I just never knew that Gabapentin was used for withdrawals as well.
     
  3. darling327

    darling327 New Member

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    Gabapentin is not the ideal drug to take Opiate w/d, and I 'll tell you why. Opiates act on both opiate receptors as well as Gaba receptors. Now, drugs like Gabalin , Valium etc all act on Gaba receptors. Gaba receptors take even longer to heal than opiate receptors. Hence the rish of a terrible withdrawal from these drugs is even worse than it is with Opiates. Sure, there is no harm in taking something like Gabapentin for a short duration of say, six weeks, but in the long run, it makes no sense, to trade one addiction for another potentially worse one. It is for these reasons, that benzos are preferred over Gabapentin. This is not to suggest that taking a benzo is a good thing,. All we are doing is trying to identify the lesser of the two evils, that may be able to make opiate withdrawal a little more comfortable.
     
  4. cookie

    cookie New Member

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    My cat has been wandering about this forum for a few days. She’s been here many times before, but always only when she is withdrawing from Oxycodone. My cat hasn’t ever posted either.


    On the fifth day of having no Opiates, quitting from a 100 mg per day Oxycodone habit, that my cat has had for more than two years. She got addicted after her hysterectomy which she had because of ovarian cancer.


    She used Oxycodone throughout her chemo, not so much for the pain, but for the great mood that Oxycodone put her in. She in fact didn’t even care that she had cancer, and was without hair, eyelashes and eyebrows. She doesn’t regret it one bit.


    Obviously my cat had to quit at some point. This happens to be her seventh attempt at quitting Opiates. My cat is pretty sure that she has covered everything ad nauseum, but thought that she should bring it up once again, because my cat frankly doesn’t think enough people are aware of it.


    Bumping this information up may help somebody else’s cat who may also happen to be suffering from Opiate withdrawal.


    My cat’s first six withdrawals were pure hell. She is not going to get into that here, because all of know what it was like. My cat is old too, and her chemo really did a number on her health. My cat doesn’t bounce back from stuff these days. That is pretty much certain.


    My cat did as much research as possible for this withdrawal, and came upon some valuable information about Gabapentin which is also known as Neurontin.


    Gabapentin can really help with the Opiate withdrawal symptoms. My cat knew that she had earlier been scripted Gabapentin, for chemo induced neuropathy, and she had actually been on it, for most of her chemo.


    My cat actually quit Gabapentin cold turkey, after six montages without suffering from any withdrawal whatsoever, even once. On Day one of the Oxycodone withdrawal, which was five days ago, my cat took 800 mg of Gabapentin. This happens to be twice her recommended dosage. My cat had read up that you invariably need to take more than your recommended dose. For two hours after taking the Gabapentin, nothing happened.


    My cat had read that Gabapentin takes time to kick in. It really messed up my cat. She couldn’t see straight or walk straight and then passed out for ten hours straight. She woke up feeling quite strung out, but quite surprisingly, without any withdrawal symptoms.


    Later on in the evening, my cat again started to feel some withdrawal coming on. My cat popped another 800 mg of Gabapentin. Voila! The exact same thing repeated.


    To cut a long story short, today is the fifth day, without Oxycodone, and though my cat has needed to step her dose up to 1600 mg twice daily, she has had very few withdrawal symptoms, if any at all. My cat even woke up early this morning, and had a shower and put some make up on. My cat then went horse riding in the woods with her friends.


    I shall mention the only side effects experienced as well. One was the bloating and the other was an increased appetite. This is the first time ever that my cat has been able to eat anything at all during the first week of Opiate withdrawal. She was actually hogging away.


    This whole experience has been nothing short of amazing for my cat. She spoke to many other cats over the last few days, on the internet, about this experience, and ascertained that it may also help her get through PAWS , which was what usually lead her back to abusing Opiates.


    Some cats also were of the opinion that it was possible to continue the Gabapentin as a mood enhancer. The best part about Gabapentin is that it is flat out inexpensive. My cat certainly thinks Gabapentin is a miracle drug for withdrawal from Opiates. My cat is happy on day five of her withdrawal right now!
     
  5. Julian91

    Julian91 New Member

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    I too have had this experience like you where I found out that Gabapentin was nothing short of a miracle, when it came to withdrawal from Opiates. Even a small dose like 300 mg can help with the really severe problems that one encounters during Opiate withdrawal.

    Gabapentin is not an Opiate. Therefore, you cannot expect it to be like methadone or suboxone. It certainly trumps cold turkey.
     
  6. jonilind

    jonilind New Member

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    I have a stock of 300 mg Gabapentin pills, and wondering whether taking 1200 mg daily for the next three or four days can make my Opiate withdrawal a little easier on me. From whatever information I was able to find online, it seems as though Gabapentin does help.
     
  7. Miller

    Miller New Member

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    Neurontin helped me with some of my Opiate withdrawal symptoms, but I still had plenty of symptoms, that Neurontin couldn’t help.
     
  8. Redd

    Redd New Member

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    I always make sure to use Gabapentin, so that I can avoid the withdrawal. In fact, I am going to day, to get my prescription from my Doc. I took my last methadone about forty days ago, and have five days remaining , until my prescription would normally get filled. Since I have been taking at least 30 mg daily, I seem to have run out already. What I want to do is, to take Gabapentin along with Loperamide for two days, while adding 4 mg of Suboxone on the second day.
     
  9. Papple

    Papple New Member

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    I used something similar to Neurontin, called Lyrica along with Clonidine , to manage my withdrawals. I used to use around 100 mg of Opiates on a daily basis, and I quit cold turkey and still managed to go through hardly any withdrawal at all, and the secret for me, is extreme dosing. I take well-over thrice the maximum dose of Lyrica , even more Neurontin , with lots of Clonidine. I doubt I could have achieved the same results without these meds.
     
  10. MarriedGal

    MarriedGal New Member

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    I am aware that there is lots of information already about Opiate withdrawals and how to deal with them, on the internet. The problem is, all the information directs you towards going to your pharmacist and buying prescription drugs. This may be possible for some people, but what about the others, who may not have access to drugs like say, Clonidine?


    The list of prescription drugs available for Opiate withdrawals is long, starting off with Compazine, Seroquel, Risperidone, Trazadone and so on. If everybody withdrawing from Opiates actually had access to all these drugs, then nobody would have any problems. Since that is not the case, I would like to mention over here some of the natural and commonly accessible remedies.


    Try and take any good multivitamin , perhaps a double dose, in the morning. Take a double dose of Omega Fatty Acids, from Fish Oil too. There is a simple Adrenal supplement called L-Glutamine, which you can take two or three thousand mg per day. The best natural remedies are Kave Root, Milk Thistle , Lemon Balm and Jamaican Dog Wood.


    You can even take some Benedryl, but make sure that you are not taking the type that makes you drowsy, especially if you are taking it during the day. Any difficulty in Bowels or problems passing stool can be addressed with some Immodium.


    Before you go to sleep at night, you should have some more Kava Root, and a double dose of Melotonin.


    Valerian Root, which is easily available as an extract is very good to take in the night, just before going to bed.
     
  11. Alan7008

    Alan7008 New Member

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    I have found that nothing compares to or even comes close to cannabis, to fight against the anxiety, irritation, and the pain, caused by Opiate withdrawal. CBD oil, which is non-psychoactive, when given along with Cannabis, makes it an effective remedy for Opiate withdrawal. Cannabis does not harm the user either. There is enough documentation to show that Cannabis helps treat anxiety, depression and pain – especially chronic pain. Cannabis also helps a whole lot of other ailments that people who have epilepsy, or say Cancer suffer from. The features of Opiate withdrawals are actually quite similar to the symptoms of a Cancer patient or someone with Epilepsy.
     
  12. PeterJ

    PeterJ New Member

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    #12 PeterJ, Jul 21, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 19, 2017
    Gabapentin can be a very useful drug in treating Opiate withdrawal. It also comes with its own risks and dangers, unless used responsibly. I don’t intend to disrupt your celebrations, but I have to say that quitting Gabapentin cold turkey is a stupid idea. I happen to be epileptic. I am not badly epileptic though. I consider myself luckier than most people who suffer from epilepsy.

    My threshold for seizures goes down when I am sick. This happened when I was down with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia when I was a teenager. I suffer from fits, blackouts, and absence seizures. I had my last seizure more than 7 years back when I caught my best friend giving my then fiancé a chest massage.

    Fast-forwarding to more recent times, I was scripted Gabapentin this year and I really liked it. When a person has tried everything under the sun, for trigeminal neuralgia, and are in the process of developing cauda equine syndrome, a drug like Gabapentin that reduces neuropathic pain by dampening one’s impulses is amazing.

    One fine day, I had been out for two days, and had travelled the night home and slept in. I woke up and began fumbling about, because my medicine boxes had been packed for the trip and were in my bag. I took my pills that day morning, had lunch with some friends who came over, and even went to church.

    I never realized that I had missed a dose. I had not missed the first daily dose, but the second daily dose. I was taking 600 mg four times a day. The next thing I know is I am coming around from a fifty minute long seizure and am drooling all over and my back is totally messed up. Since then, I have had a few seizures, but I always remember to take my gabapentin, by setting alarms.

    My doses do not vary by even minutes, and I am having chronic pain and feel exhausted. Sadly, gabapentin is now the reason all this is happening. I want to warn you that Gabapentin puts you at risk of having a seizure even if you have never before in your life had one. It simply lowers your seizure threshold and makes your body susceptible to an attack. It does not actually trigger the seizure.

    It leaves it to the body to trigger its own seizure. This can turn into a permanent effect in some people who take Gabapentin. You should never assume that since you are in perfect health you will never have a seizure. I had a friend who had never had a seizure in his life and we were at a pub when he suddenly had a seizure and died right there after smashing his head into the bar while falling down.

    He just never came around from that seizure, period! This could happen to any of your friends or even to you.

    This is precisely why I have tapered my Gabapentin down to 300 mg four times a day. I would advise everybody to taper Gabapentin very slowly. I would suggest 100 mg of each dose, every five days, which is both the safest and fastest, in my opinion.

    Though it is very hard to OD on Gabapentin, there are other things you need to worry about such as Gabapentin’s own withdrawal risks. You should actually treat Gabapentin with as much caution as you would treat Benzos.
     
  13. moonman

    moonman New Member

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    In my country, Australia, Gabapentin is not on the PBS. Therefore, if you are not on Gabapentin for epilepsy, you have to pay $85 per box of 300 mg tablets or $132 for Neurontin, which was my latest script, for a box of the 600 mgs.

    It certainly is expensive. But since it works so well on nerve pain, it is extremely useful in withdrawal. There is an alternative to Gabapentin called Pregabalin. You need to taper one out before starting the other.
     
  14. Loveme

    Loveme New Member

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    I Have Personally Found That What Helps Me The Most Is Fish Oil, green tea, along with some passionflower, astragalus root and lots of green tea. I manage to have a relatively pain-free withdrawal, thanks to these natural remedies. They work by curtailing the bodily inflammation, and thereby the ensuing pain.

    From my own experience, I have found that Passionflower not only helps reduce the pain, but also brings in a feeling of relaxation which eases anxiety and depression. Apparently, Passionflower increases the levels of a compound, that directly lowers the amount of brain cell activity.

    Passionflower also helps keep at bay any agitation, irritability or restlessness.
     
  15. Richardarm

    Richardarm New Member

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    Passionflower helps more than anything else, really. I took some passion flower along with vitamin B, and it made a real difference for me. My feelings of restlessness went away. I was able to sleep , at last. Not being able to sleep is my worst problem, during withdrawal, and Passionflower helps me with that.
     
  16. rollybooz

    rollybooz New Member

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    I do not smoke, but I do ingest Cannabis edibles, infused with CBD oil, and it helps me with my Opioid withdrawal.
     

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